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  • Machinery Mover

    Need to move a small verticle mill and lathe out of a garage. I have moved lathes before but not a verticle mill and not sure how to go about it.

    Are there any good movers in Los Angeles. I tried before but most don't want to bother if it is not large equipment and they can;t use a forklift.

    Any help will be appreciated.

    Thanks

    T

  • #2
    Define "small."

    The only real problem with a vertical mill is that it tends to have a high center of gravity, so one needs to be careful about tipping it over.

    It's also not too difficult to take significant pieces off a vertical mill so it doesn't have such a high center of gravity, and so it's lighter.

    When I moved my vertical mill (1200 lbs), I did it in a pickup truck. The dealer loaded it with a forklift, of course, so the problem was unloading. I rented a couple sections of pipe staging, put a heavy beam across the top, backed the truck underneath, lifted up the milling machine with a come-along, drove out the truck, and set the machine down. The technique would work just as well in reverse.

    As for moving it around, on the ground, pipe rollers work well. Just pay attention and think everything through first. Do things slowly.
    ----------
    Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
    There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
    Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
    Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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    • #3
      I guess it, not knowing the model number of the mill, it has a 6 by 18 inch table and stands about six feet tall. Rockwell mill. Looks to weigh under 1000 lbs. Lathe is a logan engine lathe with 9" swing.

      On the mill where is the best location to lift from. I was thinking of using a engin hoist to place on skates.

      T

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      • #4
        For mine, I put a sling around the ram, at the top of the column.
        ----------
        Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
        Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
        Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
        There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
        Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
        Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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        • #5
          One of the advantages of the Rockwell mill is that it is easily dismantled for moving. They can be broken down into parts that one man can handle.

          To move with a minimum of dismantling, at the least remove the head and ram and crank the knee to its lowest position. The cabinet base is sheet steel, contributing to a higher center of gravity. I would recommend lifting under the base.
          Jim H.

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          • #6
            Thanks for the info but I have a question.

            When you say base do you mean the base where it attaches to the steel cabnet?

            Parts referenced as remove for moving... other than the motor, which parts can I remove without causing problems with reassembly and alignment?

            T

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            • #7
              To move a Rockwell . Pull ram and head off .Lay in back of truck. Move base and column to back of pickup truck against tail gate . Protect with piecs of scrap carpet . Two people can tilt mill backward and heave ho it on back into truck .Just leave it on its back until you get where you are going ,and slide it out.
              Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
              http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
              http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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              • #8
                T,

                I also have a Rockwell mill. The easiest way to move it is with an engine hoist. The RW is about 800 lbs, which is no problem for an average hoist. As SGW said, the best place to lift from is from the ram, just loop a sling under the ram, on both sides of the front pillow block. Lift until it just clears the floor, and you can roll both hoist and mill, just keep it real slow and control the swinging. If you dont have enough room to manuver then lift it on to a heavy duty furniture dolly. Once out on the driveway, lift it back up, then manuver a low trailer under it (doesn't need to be a big trailer as we're only talking 800 lbs, something like a motorcycle trailer or the type gardeners use to haul equipment will work great) then lower the mill onto the trailer and strap it down. Note, do not attempt to manuver the hoist with the mill lifted high, if it starts swinging it can tip over in an instant. I used this method of moving for all of my "heavy" stuff (RW mill, SB 10L and 9A lathes, Ammco shaper, Delta surface grinder, Lincoln tig welder).

                Jeff

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                • #9
                  Jeff,

                  Thanks for the info. Will give it a shot.

                  T

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                  • #10
                    just found a set of these..you can rent them, slap-em on each side of your machine, jack up and roll. maybe the ticket for you..tho bit tougher on a mill..as you have to block to keep sides flat to mill.

                    www.rolalift.com

                    scott
                    "Good judgment comes from experience, and often experience comes from bad judgment" R.M.Brown

                    My shop tour www.plastikosmd.com

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                    • #11
                      Wow, I thought this site had died and gone away as I couldn't get it to come up for some time.

                      It looks like you've got your solution for moving the Rockwell, but if you decide you do need machinery movers in the Los Angeles area, I can highly recommend Tom's Machinery Moving in Whittier. I live in Simi and have had Tom move a mill from the OC area and a lathe from Ventura. He wasn't the cheapest, but when you watch him work, you'll see that he understands he's moving precision machinery and that he's done it for a long time and is good. The biggest thing I had him move was a Bridgeport, but he's got the equipment to move larger CNC type stuff as well.
                      Pursue Excellence and the rest will follow.

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                      • #12
                        I've got a 5936 Clausing and a Rockwell 21-100. Both are up on steel dollies. If I ever have to move them I'll just call a towing company and pull them up on a Roll-Back. I'd then use a garage jack and jack them up and put some 4X4's under them before strapping them down. Wouldn't want the caster wheels to break off if the tow truck hit a big bump.

                        They're both in my garage. I have to turn the Rockwells head on it's side to get it out of the garage.

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                        • #13
                          Just be glad you do not have to move the mill I have to move (5000 Lb. Cincinnati 2MI)
                          This one is not to easy to disassemble. However I did work out a system of
                          cast iron wheels (pulley castings) and a channel frame.
                          I just have to figure out a way to get it on and off a trailer.

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                          • #14
                            What about this guy? Supposedly he could move multi-ton rocks. Right???

                            http://www.coralcastle.com/biography.asp

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